How to Find Your Big Calling In Your Seemingly Small Life

I used to not believe it.

Even doubted to declare it.

That the minutia of one simple life and all the infinitesimal moments of an ordinary day could actually add up to one meaningful, momentous and memorable life.

I mean — can really flipping pancakes every morning and folding PJs every night lead you towards your calling?

A life destined for greatness?

I sometimes still struggle with the divide.

The gulf I feel between wanting the more ‘important’ life, or solving the bigger humanitarian crisis, or the saving of eternal souls, with the reality of doing the day-in-day-out granular drill of keeping life just running rhythmically.

Honestly — how on earth would you have the time and the energy to make life what it’s meant to be when all the time and energy is spent making life run the way it needs to be?

Childhood ideals may not quite equate to adult reality, but then — 

”who really gets to choose what they get to do in life? Or how life is to end, or how our stories are to unfold?”

I love what C.H Spurgeon wrote:

“Therefore be not discontented with your calling. Whatever God has made your position, or your work, abide in that, unless you are quite sure that He calls you to something else.

Let your first care be to glorify God to the utmost of your power where you are.

Fill your present sphere to His praise, and if He needs you in another He will show it you.

This evening lay aside vexatious ambition, and embrace peaceful content.”

The ‘laying aside of vexatious ambition, and embracing peaceful content’ — this takes another kind of seeing.

It takes a certain faith to believe that His hand is even in your here and now. Rightly where you are can be a place of inward transformation, radical revival.

The oft rushed and crazy dashes of imperfect homes with truly lively children can turn into acceptable worship.

Brownies baked with a smile can be an important service. 

Kitchen talks with little people munching muffins can be eternity-shaping, (even when you’ve had to miss birthday cruises with your girlfriends, or jumping on the plane for the perfect getaway).

This is then our big dare:

Can we really surrender to God all the parts of our lives believing that He would use every part of every day, even the grit and grime of our deepest wickedness and other people’s gravest weakness, to shape us towards a life He’s truly called us into?

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Lisa Fotios

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Perhaps this is what discovering that calling is all about.

It’s not what we envision ourselves doing.

It’s what life finds us giving.

And how we are rightly responding. 

Because all these moments make us, how we respond in every season shape us.

There’s no kidding it — in that very space where discrepancies often occur and disappointments strike, seeing God there shifts us closer towards our true call.

Because if we were to ever desire to do great things in life, or be a great worker for God, or do significant things for humanity, then perhaps the big requirement is to grow our soul to the point where we can give, and not fear like we’d run out.

To use this time to cultivate a walk with God, and actually possess what the Word says we possess; believing it and not just knowing it. 

We can learn how we are truly seen in Christ, and to walk confident, unashamed.

We can believe that our small days can lead to magnify a great God. 

To make it our ultimate aim to not find ‘the call’,  but to praise Him in all we go through as the ultimate end of all we are to become.

If we can set our gaze on Him — the small, lowly places of meagre offerings —  we’ll never ever be ousted by our disappointment, displaced with our misplaced expectation.

All these parts of life — the good, the bad, the mundane — are opportunities to experience His nearness, His perpetual goodness.  

Perhaps then in this context — it doesn’t matter then where we are, or what we do, or feel we’ve missed out on — if we can join all the seemingly disconnecting dots into a paean of praise for Him,  because ‘whosoever offers praise glorifies Him’.

I’m learning it so slowly and realizing it so painstakingly: 

The experiences of things are necessary before the study of them.

And so we can always be patient for the parts of our stories marked more with turbulent times, brazen blows, desert days and even yieldless years, than the wonderful, happy ones.

Because these little days when done faithfully removes our idealisation of what we think are our natural pluck contributing towards our great life, and gears us towards a life that is deeply abiding, bountifully a blessing.

“And I thank Christ Jesus our Lord who has enabled me, because He counted me faithful, putting me into the ministry” (NKJV) 1 Timothy 1:12

It’s true — 

It’s never because of who we are that we make it, it’s always because of who He is.

This then is the promise for anyone with a big heart and an even bigger dream:

Find your towel, roll your sleeve, and keep your eyes on Him.

Because in doing so, we’ll slip seamlessly into a life of true service, and falling in love with true greatness, we’ll then sense the calling, and walking with Him turns any ordinary day into quite glorious ones…

6 thoughts on “How to Find Your Big Calling In Your Seemingly Small Life

  1. Katha von Dessien says:

    Oh, I can relate to these questions – does what I do at the moment really matter in the long run? I work a lot with people who often don’t appreciate my work, but sometimes there is a moment when they come through and realize what this is all about. These moments remind me that I am in the right place and living out what I am called to do. Thankful to have read your thoughts today! Your FMF neighbor this week

    Like

    • Liz.W says:

      Oh Katha, thank you so much for leaving your comment. I certainly get what you’re saying. It’s never nice when people don’t seem to understand or appreciate all our hard effort. The turn around for me occurs when I begin to see how God attaches eternal value to my ordinary work, and how God was right there with me in the mundane, unconfined by what i thought was too small for me.

      That changes my attitude, which then changes my question altogether. It became no longer about finding ‘the’ call, but finding my place in the service, which becomes highly satisfying and a bit addictive.

      I found myself shifting from no longer going for ‘what’s popular’ to ‘what’s important’, and that changes my perspective. And just like that precious moment when someone gets what you’re doing, the calling supernaturally comes when we take what life offers to us, keeping our eyes on Him.

      So glad to journey together with you! Love and blessings!

      Like

  2. laurenbowerman says:

    As always, you words are so beautifully written and so poignant! I so often need to be reminded of the beauty in the little moments and in the ordinary. God is glorified there too, and that is a beautiful thing! And your point about God using this time to cultivate our walk with God – YES! I love it. Thank you for taking the time to write and share such a beautiful piece!

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    • Liz.W says:

      Oh Lauren, *thank.you* so much for your very kind words. Thank you for taking the time to stop and write back. I love what you’re doing and pray that God will use you in big and mighty ways. Love connecting with you always!

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  3. wisdomfromafather says:

    Visiting in the FMF community. There is nothing too small when performed for the Lord. Cherish the little moments — like flipping pancakes and folding PJs — because they are woven into the life we were intended to live. Great, simple, powerful words.

    Like

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